Publications

Publications in 2015 of type Article, Conference Proceedings and Edited Conference Proceedings

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    2015

    • Till Steinbach, Hyung-Taek Lim, Franz Korf, Thomas C. Schmidt, Daniel Herrscher, and Adam Wolisz. Beware of the Hidden! How Cross-traffic Affects Quality Assurances of Competing Real-time Ethernet Standards for In-Car Communication. In: 2015 IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN). Pages 1—9, Oct. 2015,
      [Abstract], [Fulltext Document (pdf)], [Slides (pdf)], [Video of Presentation], [DOI], [IEEE Xplore], [Bibtex]

      Real-time Ethernet is expected to become the core technology of future in-car communication networks. Following its current adoption in subsystems for info- and entertainment, broadband Ethernet promises new features in the core of upcoming car series. Its full potential will enfold when deploying Ethernet-based backbones that consolidate all automotive domains on a single physical layer at increased bandwidth but reduced complexity and cost. In such a backbone, traffic with a variety of real-time requirements and best-effort characteristics will share the same physical infrastructure. However, certain applications like online diagnosis, data- or firmware updates, and access to off-board backends will introduce bursty high traffic loads to the sensitive core of the cars communication network. In this work, we analyze the robustness against cross-traffic of real-time Ethernet protocols. Based on a realistic in-car scenario, we demonstrate that background cross-traffic can have significant impact on in-car backbone networks—-even for real-time protocols with strict prioritization. By comparing the real-time approaches Ethernet AVBs asynchronous credit based shaping with the time-triggered and rate-constrained traffic classes of Time-triggered Ethernet (AS6802) we quantify how different media access policies suffer from low priority bursts of applications such as diagnosis, online updates or backend-based services. Our simulation study of a realistic in-car backbone design and traffic model reveals that in a realistic in-car network design, cross-traffic may increase end-to-end latency by more than 500% while the jitter can become 14 times higher than for a network without background tasks. We discuss ways to mitigate these degrading effects.

      @InProceedings{   slksh-bhcan-15,
        author        = {Till Steinbach AND Hyung-Taek Lim AND Franz Korf AND
                        Thomas C. Schmidt AND Daniel Herrscher AND Adam Wolisz},
        title         = {{Beware of the Hidden! How Cross-traffic Affects Quality
                        Assurances of Competing Real-time Ethernet Standards for
                        In-Car Communication}},
        booktitle     = {2015 IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN)},
        month         = oct,
        year          = 2015,
        pages         = {1--9},
        isbn          = {978-1-4673-6770-7},
        doi           = {10.1109/LCN.2015.7366277},
        eprinttype    = {ieeexplore},
        eprint        = {7366277},
        abstract      = {Real-time Ethernet is expected to become the core
                        technology of future in-car communication networks.
                        Following its current adoption in subsystems for info- and
                        entertainment, broadband Ethernet promises new features in
                        the core of upcoming car series. Its full potential will
                        enfold when deploying Ethernet-based backbones that
                        consolidate all automotive domains on a single physical
                        layer at increased bandwidth but reduced complexity and
                        cost. In such a backbone, traffic with a variety of
                        real-time requirements and best-effort characteristics will
                        share the same physical infrastructure. However, certain
                        applications like online diagnosis, data- or firmware
                        updates, and access to off-board backends will introduce
                        bursty high traffic loads to the sensitive core of the cars
                        communication network. In this work, we analyze the
                        robustness against cross-traffic of real-time Ethernet
                        protocols. Based on a realistic in-car scenario, we
                        demonstrate that background cross-traffic can have
                        significant impact on in-car backbone networks---even for
                        real-time protocols with strict prioritization. By
                        comparing the real-time approaches Ethernet AVBs
                        asynchronous credit based shaping with the time-triggered
                        and rate-constrained traffic classes of Time-triggered
                        Ethernet (AS6802) we quantify how different media access
                        policies suffer from low priority bursts of applications
                        such as diagnosis, online updates or backend-based
                        services. Our simulation study of a realistic in-car
                        backbone design and traffic model reveals that in a
                        realistic in-car network design, cross-traffic may increase
                        end-to-end latency by more than 500\% while the jitter can
                        become 14 times higher than for a network without
                        background tasks. We discuss ways to mitigate these
                        degrading effects.},
        langid        = {english},
        note          = {LCN Best Paper Award}
      }
    • Till Steinbach, Philipp Meyer, Stefan Buschmann, Franz Korf, and Thomas C. Schmidt. Demo: Prototyping Next-Generation In-Car Backbones Using System-Level Network Simulation. In: 2015 IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN). Oct. 2015,
      [Abstract], [Fulltext Document (pdf)], [Poster (pdf)], [Bibtex]

      We show a network simulation environment for assessing Ethernet-based concepts and technologies of next generation in-car networks, as well as their protocols, and possible deployment. Among others, the simulation models contain the core concepts of AS6802 and AFDX, Ethernet AVB and IEEE 802.1Q as well as legacy fieldbus technologies like CAN and FlexRay and automotive gateway designs to interconnect the technologies. All modules can be flexibly configured and combined or used as a foundation for the implementation of new ideas. System-level network simulation allows us to design and evaluate backbone architectures and develop protocols and configurations that comply with the rigid real-time requirements of in-car communication. The shown tool chain is open source and can be downloaded for experiments and reviews of published simulation studies at http://core4inet.realmv6.org

      @InProceedings{   smbks-pnibu-15,
        author        = {Till Steinbach AND Philipp Meyer AND Stefan Buschmann AND
                        Franz Korf AND Thomas C. Schmidt},
        title         = {{Demo: Prototyping Next-Generation In-Car Backbones Using
                        System-Level Network Simulation}},
        booktitle     = {2015 IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN)},
        month         = oct,
        year          = 2015,
        abstract      = {We show a network simulation environment for assessing
                        Ethernet-based concepts and technologies of next generation
                        in-car networks, as well as their protocols, and possible
                        deployment. Among others, the simulation models contain the
                        core concepts of AS6802 and AFDX, Ethernet AVB and IEEE
                        802.1Q as well as legacy fieldbus technologies like CAN and
                        FlexRay and automotive gateway designs to interconnect the
                        technologies. All modules can be flexibly configured and
                        combined or used as a foundation for the implementation of
                        new ideas. System-level network simulation allows us to
                        design and evaluate backbone architectures and develop
                        protocols and configurations that comply with the rigid
                        real-time requirements of in-car communication. The shown
                        tool chain is open source and can be downloaded for
                        experiments and reviews of published simulation studies at
                        http://core4inet.realmv6.org},
        langid        = {english}
      }